Creeping Bellflower

This weekly Wednesday post is from PEIISC member and Stewardship Coordinator at Island Nature Trust, Julie-Lynn Zahavich. This week, Julie-Lynn will share her experience with a common horticultural invasive, Creeping Bellflower. Creeping Bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides) is an ornamental plant that was imported from Europe. It has heart-shaped leaves that grow around the base of the […]

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Valuing Our Urban Forests

This week’s post is by Beth Hoar, Chair of PEIISC and Parkland Conservationist for the City of Charlottetown. There are many reasons to value our urban forests. They provide economic, social and environmental benefits such as filtering pollutants from our air and water, preventing soil erosion and reducing storm water runoff, reducing the energy consumption […]

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An Update on the Spiders of PEI Project

This week, Rosemary Curley, Biologist, President of Nature PEI and member of PEIISC, brings you some news on the Spiders of PEI project! The numbers of exotic spiders are now tabulated for Prince Edward Island. Fully 19 of 197 known species have arrived from elsewhere, and of this 9.6 %, seven of them like to […]

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Scotch Pine in PEI National Park

This week’s post is from Linda Thomas, Resource Management Officer, PEI National Parks and PEI Invasvie Species Council member. Welcome to the fall season, we have had a busy summer with invasive species in PEI National Park and have started to look at our results. More details later. In PEI National Park success is measured […]

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A Focus on Native Species

From Julie-Lynn Zahavich, Stewardship Coordinator at Island Nature Trust: Every summer, staff from Island Nature Trust work to control a persistent population of purple loosestrife at Deroche Pond. Deroche Pond is a large pond that lies behind Blooming Point Beach, a popular summer haunt for many islanders. This year, we noticed that the population had […]

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Look Out for Japanese Beetles

This weeks Facebook post is by Beth Hoar, Chair of PEIISC and City of Charlottetown’s Parkland Conservationist Have you been seeing a lot more of these guys this year???? It’s the beautiful but notorious Japanese beetle! We certainly have be seeing a lot of them around Charlottetown. They have been feeding on the vegetable planters […]

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The Spread of Wild Cucumber in PEI

This weeks post and photos are from Rosemary Curley, PEIISC Council Member. Wild cucumber is spreading rapidly in cental Prince Edward Island, probably under the influence of warmer weather. Trees and shrubs that are blanketed by wild cucumber will be weakened, and some will not survive. Here is wild cucumber along Confederation Trail in the […]

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Asian Gypsy Moth

Todays post is by Jennifer Cameron, PEIISC Council member and Regional Plant Protection Officer, Canadian Food Inspection Agency / Government of Canada Asian Gypsy Moth The European strain of Gypsy Moth has become established in many parts of eastern North America, but did you know there is a more destructive Asian strain as well? It […]

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A Curiously Shady Character: Bittersweet Nightshade

A Curiously Shady Character: Bittersweet Nightshade An ominous name to begin with, this perennial vine is seen throughout Prince Edward Island. This little beast has a number of names, including climbing nightshade, and thrives in a wide variety of habitats; however, it loves to grow around streams and wetlands. It can become prolific, growing out […]

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The Wrong Kind of Gardening Legacy

The Wrong Kind of Gardening Legacy Late in July this year, PEI Invasive Species Council member Megan Harris got a call from one of her neighbours in St. Catherine’s. He was convinced he had a rogue giant hogweed plant growing along the edge of his driveway. Megan wasn’t convinced until he said that a previous […]

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European Pine Shoot Moth

European Pine Shoot Moth Rhyacionia buoliana Article by David Carmichael,P.E.I. Department of Communities, Land and Environment and PEIISC Council member Background information: This pest was first recorded in New York State in 1914 and has since spread to many areas in southern Canada. Preferred Hosts: Red Pine is most susceptible, Jack Pine, non native Austrian […]

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White Sweet Clover

This week’s post is from Linda Thomas, Resource Management Officer at PEI National Park. Summer seems to be flying by, we are concentrating on managing our five targeted invasive plant species here in PEI National Park. We have finished with garlic mustard and Japanese knotweed for this year, currently working on glossy buckthorn. Purple loosestrife […]

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Top 10 Invasive and Horticultural Plants Across Canada

This weeks post is from Council member, Karen Samis, Assistant Professor, UPEI Biology Department This week, I thought we could focus on the Top 10 Invasive and Horticultural Plants Across Canada. Although I love to see diversity in a garden as much as anyone, we need to be careful to ensure the plants we choose […]

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Buyer Beware – Norway Maples

 Buyer Beware – Norway Maples Post by PEIISC Member and Kensington North Watersheds Association Executive Director, Barry Murray Norway Maples are fast growing trees that are very popular in urban areas. Their good shape, quick growth and tolerance to exposure make them favourites on lawns and around buildings. They in fact have adapted too well […]

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Campers… and invasive hitchhikers!

Campers… and invasive hitchhikers! Post by PEIISC Council member Jennifer Cameron With the warmer (?) weather everyone wants to be outside, and for many people that includes loading up the vehicles to go camping. But many invasive pests can hitch a ride to the campground with you. Campgrounds are hotspots for invasive species, and often […]

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Spring is here!

Tis the Season! It’s the most wonderful time of the year…gardening season! With it comes beautiful flower beds, gardens and baskets, but it also means learning to identify invasive species when purchasing your lovely greenery and flowers. There are several known invasive species sold across Canada, and we strongly encourage you to be aware of […]

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Seed Bombs

Seed Bombs – Post by Beth Hoar, PEIISC “A seed bomb is a little ball made up of a combination of compost, clay and seeds.” The seed bombs are then dropped in places that need to be re-vegetated or beautified. Historically, seed bombs have been around since the 1930’s and have been used to distribute […]

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Spring Creep

Our weekly Wednesday post is from council member, Kelley Farrar (Arnold), watershed coordinator for the Stratford Area Watershed Group. This week’s topic: “Spring Creep”! Once this polar vortex is out of our way, spring will (hopefully!) be well on its way. With the warming temperatures comes the inevitable race between native and invasive species. Unfortunately, […]

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Tree Insects & Diseases: PEI

PEIISC member, David Carmichael, has been working on another Facebook page (Tree Insects & Diseases: PEI) for a year now. The page features many photo albums with photos of various types of trees and pests. The albums can help you identify problems on your own trees and on trees in public places. The page also […]

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Spring Creep

Our weekly Wednesday post is from council member, Kelley Farrar (Arnold), watershed coordinator for the Stratford Area Watershed Group. This week’s topic: “Spring Creep”! Once this polar vortex is out of our way, spring will (hopefully!) be well on its way. With the warming temperatures comes the inevitable race between native and invasive species. Unfortunately, […]

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European Larch Canker

This weekly Wednesday post is from council member, David Carmichael. David is a Landscape Technician with PEI’s Department of Agriculture and Forestry. Today’s topic is European larch canker. European larch canker, caused by the fungus Lachnellula willkommii, is a serious disease in many parts of Europe. The disease is also present in Japan, China, and […]

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DUC Conservator: Fighting the Mighty Phragmites

Jana, our Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) representative, sent along this story today from Conservator, DUC’s magazine. The article is from Ontario but there are known populations of phragmites on PEI too. LINK: http://www.conservator.ca/2015/10/fighting-the-mighty-phragmites/ At our first annual public meeting tomorrow, we will hear from PEIISC member, Rosemary Curley, on the work she has been doing […]

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Buyer Beware! Plant Me Instead

This Wednesday we hear from PEIISC Chair and gardener, Beth Hoar. I am an avid gardener. I love plants (especially ferns) and plant a mix of native and non-native species. My favorite activity is spending time in my yard, both working in my perennial beds, planting new trees and shrubs or just wandering around enjoying […]

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Issue 2 of Spotter’s Network Newsletter Now Online

Issue 2 of the Spotter’s Network Newsletter is now available online! To read the latest issue, click here. To sign up for the Spotter’s Network, click here.

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Hello Spring, Hello Invasive Species!

With the recent warm weather, many Islanders are starting to think about spring. With spring comes new growth of grass, leaves, flowers, and invasive species! So, while spring is on the brain, we thought we would take this opportunity to remind everyone of our Spotter’s Network Program. The PEI Invasive Species Spotter’s Network is a […]

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What’s happening to your lilies?

This summer, if you see damage to the leaves, buds and flowers of your lilies, you may have an infestation of lily leaf beetles. The lily leaf beetle loves to feed on Lilium sp. (true lilies: Turk’s cap, Tiger, Easter, Asiatic and Oriental lilies) and Fritillaria sp.; have been known to feed on Solomon’s seal […]

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Improving Our Knowledge of Island Spiders

This week, we hear from retired wildlife biologist and President of Nature PEI, Rosemary Curley, on a project she worked on in 2015 to improve our knowledge of Island spiders. From the Nature PEI website, “Shaking the Bushes for PEI Spiders” published July 29, 2015: “Few share a fascination for spiders, but this summer in […]

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Round Table Discussion with Island Watershed Groups A Success!

January 29, 2016: Thank you to all of the Island watershed group coordinators and representatives that attended our round table discussion this morning! It was fantastic to meet, share ideas, and discuss how we can move forward together on tackling invasive species on PEI. And thank you to our funding partners, PEI Wildlife Conservation Fund […]

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PEI Invasive Species Council calls on watershed groups for input

Watershed organizations are a ‘logical group to reach out to,’ says invasive species council The province’s watershed groups will come together Friday to discuss the challenges they face when working with invasive species. Hosted by the PEI Invasive Species Council (PEIISC) with funding from the P.E.I. Wildlife Conservation Fund and the Friends of the Environment […]

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WOOD PACKAGING – A PATHWAY FOR INVASION

Today, PEIISC member and Plant Protection Program Officer with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Jennifer Cameron, fills us in on a major pathway for invasive species – wood packaging material. WOOD PACKAGING – A PATHWAY FOR INVASION One of the highest-risk pathways for invasion of new forest pests into Canada is through wood packaging. Wood […]

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Spotlight on an Invader: Woodland Angelica (Angelica sylvestris)

If you spend any time in Southeastern PEI during the summer you are likely very familiar with woodland angelica (Angelica sylvestris). This robust plant grows in large swathes, entirely filling ditches along Route 4 from High Bank to Murray River. Woodland angelica has been used for centuries for culinary and medicinal purposes. Its leaves, stems […]

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The Balsam Woolly Adelgid (Adelges piceae)

Today we hear from David Carmichael, PEIISC member and Horticulturist with the provincial government, on the Balsam Woolly Adelgid (Adelges piceae). INTRODUCTION The balsam woolly adelgid (Adelges piceae) (BWA) is a tiny, soft-bodied insect which appear, once matured, as white, woolly spots on true firs. The adelgid was introduced from central Europe where it feeds […]

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2015 Phragmites Surveys

This week, we hear from retired wildlife biologist, Rosemary Curley, on her work with common reed grass. Common reed grass (Phragmites australis ssp. australis) is an invasive perennial grass that is native to Eurasia. It is not known for certain how it was moved to North America, but it likely arrived on the Atlantic coast […]

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Happy Holidays… Invasive Species Style!

  Michigan State University brings us The Twelve Days of Christmas – aquatic invasive species awareness!  

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