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Lily Leaf Beetle (Lilioceris lilii)

The lily leaf beetle is thought to be native to Asia.  It was first discovered in North America in Montreal in the 1940s and has since spread throughout the U.S. and Canada.  They feed on members of the Lillium and Fritillaria genera, but often will “taste” other plants (e.g. bittersweet, potato, hollyhock, hosta spp.) but […]

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Asian Long-horned Beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)

  The Asian long-horned beetle (ALHB) is native to China and Korea, where it’s considered a forest pest as well.  ALHB was accidentally introduced in to Canada in the 1990s via untreated shipping pallets.  It infests all deciduous trees, but prefers native maple species.  ALHB has been detected in Ontario, but has not been detected […]

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Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetle (Tetropium fuscum)

The brown spruce longhorn beetle (BSLB) is an invasive forest insect.  It is native to Europe.  The first occurrence in Canada was in Halifax in 1999, but it has been established in Nova Scotia since 1990.  The beetle likely arrived in wood packaging brought over in container ships. (Natural Resources Canada) BSLB infest spruce trees […]

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European Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar)

Gypsy moth was introduced to Northeastern United States in the 1860’s and has since spread to several provinces including PEI, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. It is found each year in British Columbia but has not established a permanent population yet due to lots of hard work to eradicate it. IDENTIFICATION Gypsy moth […]

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Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis)

Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis) The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an invasive beetle that attacks and kills all species of ash trees, except mountain ash (which is not a true ash species).  EAB was brought to North America from Asia. It was first detected near Detroit, MI and in Windsor, ON in 2002. It […]

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Japanese Beetle (Popillia japonica)

The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica, is native to Japan. However, it has been invading North America since the early 1900s. It skeletonizes plants by eating only the green, leafy material and leaving behind only the leaf veins. The beetle is known to affect: elm, maple, grape vine, hops, canna, crape myrtles, peach, apple, apricot, cherry, […]

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