HISTORY

Giant hogweed originally came from Asia. It was introduced to North America as an ornamental garden plant. It is now found in many provinces throughout Canada, as well as a number of US states. There are only a couple of known sites on PEI, and all are contained within private gardens.

IDENTIFICATION

Giant hogweed has several look-a-likes that grow in PEI, including: cow parsnip, woodland angelica, and Queen Anne’s lace. Here are a few features you can use to positively identify giant hogweed:

N Giant hogweed can have negative impacts on both the environment and human health. It is able to outcompete native plants by monopolizing the light supply with its broad leaves and tall stem. The sap of giant hogweed can cause severe photodermititis in humans. Contact with the sap on skin, coupled with exposure to UV rays, can cause burning and blistering. The affected area may take months to fully heal, and can remain sensitive for years. HISTORY Giant hogweed originally came from Asia. It was introduced to North America as an ornamental garden plant. It is now found in many provinces throughout Canada, as well as a number of US states. There are only a couple of known sites on PEI, and all are contained within private gardens. IDENTIFICATION Giant hogweed has several look-a-likes that grow in PEI, including: cow parsnip, woodland angelica, and Queen Anne’s lace. Here are a few features you can use to positively identify giant hogweed: G